THE SEMANTIC PROSODY ANALYSIS OF ‘INCREASE’ IN COVID-19: A CORPUS-BASED STUDY

  • Anis Sulalah Universitas Airlangga
Keywords: Collocates, semantic prosody, Covid-19, increase

Abstract

Abstract: Increase is a neutral word that is generally perceived as a positive word, were synonymous with positive words such as rise, grow, expand. However, when resorting to dictionary definitions, increase has been found to possess negative words such as 'increase the violence'. This study investigates how 'increase', generally often categorized with positive words, interacts with neighboring words to achieve particular meanings and how particular forms of several words can change a word to negative, positive and neutral connotation. This study is analyzed on a descriptive qualitative research design because corpus linguistic research needs to be interpreted more with qualitative considerations. The data are collected using a corpus-based approach, Covid-19 corpora, and the data analysis using semantic prosody based on Stubbs's (1998) theory. The result of the data showed that word increase in Covid-19 corpora have negative meaning if it is collocated with several word such as risk, rate, levels, number, significantly and associated and followed by negative word but it will have positive meaning if it is located with word expression.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Arum, K. W. A. (2011). A DIACHRONIC CORPUS BASED ANALYSIS OF THE ADJECTIVAL COLLOCATES OF [MAN] AND [WOMAN] IN AMERICAN ENGLISH FROM 1861 TO 2010. UNIVERSITAS AIRLANGGA.
BBC Language Teaching. Retrived from: https??www.teachingenglish.org.uk?article?comtemt-words.
Collins Online Dictionary (2020). Retrieved from: https??www.collinsdictionary.com/
Bill, L. (2000). CONTEXTUAL PROSODIC THEORY: BRINGING SEMANTIC PROSODIES TO LIFE.
Cermakova, A., Halliday, M. A. K., TEUBERT, W., & YALLOP, C. (2004). Lexicology and Corpus Linguistics: An Introduction. London New York: Continuum International Publishing Group.
Firth, J. R. (1961). Papers in Linguistics 1934-1951: Repr. Oxford University Press.
Hoey, M. (2003). Lexical priming and the qualities of text. Retrieved October, 14(2008), 35–58.
Hunston, S. (2002). Corpora in applied linguistics. Ernst Klett Sprachen.
Jones, C., & Waller, D. (2015). Corpus linguistics for grammar: A guide for research. Routledge.
Lin, Y.-Y., & Chung, S.-F. (2016). A Corpus-Based Study on the Semantic Prosody of Challenge. Taiwan Journal of TESOL, 13(2), 99–146.
Longman Online Dictionary (2020). Retrieved from: https://www.ldocenline.com/
Louw, B. (1993). Irony in the text or insincerity in the writer? The diagnostic potential of semantic prosodies. Text and Technology: In Honour of John Sinclair, 157, 176.
Nelson, M. (2006). Semantic associations in Business English: A corpus-based analysis. English for Specific Purposes, 25(2), 217–234.
Oxford English Online Dictionary (2020). Retrieved from: https://www.oed.com/Partington, A. (1998). Patterns and meanings: Using corpora for English language research and teaching (Vol. 2). John Benjamins Publishing.
Schmitt, N., & Carter, R. (2004). Formulaic sequences in action. Formulaic Sequences: Acquisition, Processing and Use, 1–22.
Stubbs, M. (2001). Computer-assisted text and corpus analysis: Lexical cohesion and communicative competence. The Handbook of Discourse Analysis, 18, 304.
Stubbs, M. (2002). Two quantitative methods of studying phraseology in English. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 7(2), 215–244.
Published
2020-10-12
How to Cite
Sulalah, A. (2020). THE SEMANTIC PROSODY ANALYSIS OF ‘INCREASE’ IN COVID-19: A CORPUS-BASED STUDY. Lire Journal (Journal of Linguistics and Literature), 4(2), 237-246. https://doi.org/10.33019/lire.v4i2.92